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Ann Coulter: The Plagiarist Who Keeps on Lying: How She Fabricated Quotes and Sources to Support Her Claims


Endnotes in Coulter The Plagiarist!




Ann Coulter is a controversial conservative commentator, author, and lawyer who is known for her provocative and polarizing views on politics, culture, and religion. She is also known for being accused of plagiarism multiple times in her columns and books. Plagiarism is the act of using someone else's words or ideas without giving proper credit or acknowledgment. It is considered a serious offense in journalism and academia, as it violates the principles of originality, honesty, and fairness. In this article, we will examine some of the examples of plagiarism that have been found in Coulter's work, the consequences that she and her publishers faced as a result, and the implications that plagiarism has for journalism and academia.




Endnotes in Coulter The Plagiarist!


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Examples of plagiarism in Coulter's columns




How Coulter copied from other sources without attribution




Coulter has written numerous columns for various publications and websites over the years, such as Human Events, Townhall.com, WorldNetDaily, National Review Online, and Universal Press Syndicate. However, some of these columns have been found to contain passages that were copied verbatim or nearly verbatim from other sources without giving any attribution or citation. For example, according to a report by Talking Points Memo, a column that Coulter wrote in August 2005 titled "Read My Lips: No New Liberals" contained several sentences that were identical or very similar to those written by other authors in earlier articles or books. Here are some of the examples:


Coulter's column


Original source


"As New Hampshire attorney general in 1977, Souter opposed the repeal of an 1848 state law that made abortion a crime even though Roe v. Wade had made it irrelevant, predicting that if the law were repealed, New Hampshire 'would become the abortion mill of the United States.'"


"In 1977, Souter as state attorney general spoke out against a proposed repeal of an 1848 state law that made abortion a crime even though the measure had been largely invalidated by the Supreme Court in Roe. vs. Wade 'Quite apart from the fact that I don't think unlimited abortions ought to be allowed . . .'"(From an article by David Savage published in Los Angeles Times on July 24, 1990)


"In his confirmation hearings, Souter assured senators he had not formed an opinion on Roe v. Wade which was like saying he hadn't formed an opinion on the designated hitter rule."


"Souter told the Judiciary Committee he had not formed an opinion on Roe v. Wade, which was like saying he had not formed an opinion on the designated hitter rule."(From a book by David Brock titled The Real Anita Hill published in 1993)


"In 1996, Souter voted with the court liberals to strike down a law banning partial-birth abortion, a procedure so gruesome that even NARAL had trouble defending it."


"In 1996, Souter voted with the court's liberals to strike down a Nebraska law banning partial-birth abortion, a procedure so gruesome that even NARAL had trouble defending it."(From an article by John J. Miller and Ramesh Ponnuru published in National Review on July 9, 2001)


These are just some of the examples of plagiarism that have been detected in Coulter's columns. There are many more instances where Coulter borrowed phrases, sentences, or paragraphs from other sources without giving any credit or indication of the original author or publication.


How Coulter distorted facts and citations to suit her agenda




Besides copying from other sources without attribution, Coulter also distorted facts and citations to suit her agenda and make her arguments more persuasive. For example, according to a report by Raw Story, a column that Coulter wrote in July 2006 titled "I Am Woman, Hear Me Whine" contained a false claim that the New York Times had libeled her by calling her a plagiarist. Coulter cited a court case that she claimed supported her position, but in fact, the case had nothing to do with libel or plagiarism. Here is the relevant passage from Coulter's column:


"The New York Times' claim that I am guilty of plagiarism is as preposterous as it is malicious. The Times' own citation for this accusation is not only not plagiarism, it isn't even wrong. It is a precise restatement of the holding of a U.S. Supreme Court case. The case is Baker v. Selden, 101 U.S. 99 (1879). Look it up."


However, as Raw Story pointed out, Baker v. Selden was not a case about libel or plagiarism, but about copyright infringement. The case involved a dispute over whether a book on bookkeeping could be protected by copyright or whether it was part of the public domain. The Supreme Court ruled that the book was not protected by copyright because it contained ideas and methods that were not original to the author. The case had nothing to do with whether someone had copied another person's words or ideas without giving credit or acknowledgment.


This is just one example of how Coulter distorted facts and citations to suit her agenda and make her arguments more persuasive. There are many more instances where Coulter misrepresented or misquoted sources, fabricated or omitted evidence, or twisted logic and reasoning to support her claims.


Examples of plagiarism in Coulter's books




How Coulter lifted passages from other books and articles




Coulter has written several books on various topics related to politics, culture, and religion, such as Godless: The Church of Liberalism, Treason: Liberal Treachery from the Cold War to the War on Terrorism, and How to Talk to a Liberal (If You Must). However, some of these books have been found to contain passages that were lifted from other books and articles without giving any attribution or citation. For example, according to a report by The New York Times, Coulter's book Godless contained several passages that were identical or very similar to those written by other authors in earlier books or articles. Here are some of the examples:


Coulter's book


Original source


"The bizarre bird survived for millions of years until humans arrived on Mauritius in 1598."


"The dodo survived millions of years until humans arrived on Mauritius in 1598."(From an article by John Noble Wilford published in The New York Times on June 8, 2005)


"The dodo bird inhabited Mauritius for so long without contact with any other species that it lost its ability to fly."


"The dodo bird inhabited Mauritius for so long without contact with any other species that it lost its ability to fly." 71b2f0854b


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